Birkenstocks.com “World famous shoe brand” expires. Are domain renewals really that easy to forget?

Birkenstocks

In terms of exact volume, the keyword birkenstock is searched over 670,000 times per month. While birkenstocks is searched over 100,000 times per month globally.

It’s quite amazing to see the domain names that show up on the pre-release list each day, keeping in mind, that just because the domain name expires and sits in a pre-release status, doesn’t mean the owner can’t get it back in time before it deletes. 

Here’s another case where a great domain name has expired: Birkenstocks.com.  Obviously, this one is a little different.  While some domains expire after a company shuts down, Birkenstock is still in business and owns several domain names like Birkenstock.com and Birkenstock.de. 

When you visit Birkenstock.com you can choose the country you want to visit.  Say for example, you want to buy Birkenstocks in the USA, you can jump to BirkenstockUSA.com. 

Birkenstocks.com was originally owned by the company and at one time was a destination website for birkenstock sandals.  However, on April 4, 2010 that all changed when the domain expired.  As of today, the name is set for auction on NameJet on May 9, 2010 and currently only has five bids.

Dwight Schrute of The Office, wears Birkenstocks
 
According to Wikipedia, the Birkenstock brand traces its roots to a German by the name of Johann Adam Birkenstock. Birkenstock was registered in 1774 as a “subject and shoemaker” in local church archives. Then in 1967, shoes started being sold in the USA after American Margot Fraser “discovered” the Birkenstock sandals while on a holiday in Germany…

If you haven’t seen Birkenstocks lately, you’d probably recognize them on the TV Show The Office. As Wikipedia points out, Dwight Schrute keeps a spare pair of Birkenstocks in his car for special occasions.

Valuate.com appraises the domain name at $277,000.  But this is a name you probably want to avoid. The word Birkenstock is trademarked.  And it’s probably only a matter of time before the company realizes the oversight.  Or, goes after the new owner at some point in the future.

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