Microsoft files dispute over and domain names

Xbox One

Microsoft has filed a complaint (Case Number 1501205) with the National Arbitration Forum (NAF) over the domain names and

The filing appeared online today, just two days after the company announced its next-generation console the Xbox One.

For months speculation, often based on domain registrations by the company, was rampant as to what Microsoft would call the next Xbox.

The company kept the name a secret, and kept away from registering “Xbox One” domains that would have tipped their hand. (WHOIS) and (WHOIS) are registered to a resident of the United Kingdom.

Both domains are parked at Go Daddy today, but at one point, was a website dedicated to Xbox-related news.  Here’s a screenshot of the website from the early 2000s, courtesy of

Xbox One Website

As I’ve written before, Microsoft has had a lot of success with its domain disputes, so its latest case will almost certainly go in its favor. was ordered transferred to Microsoft, as was and   The list of victories in domain disputes for Microsoft goes on and on.  In 2012, Microsoft took ownership of several names such as,, and just to name a few.

It appears only a single complaint was filed for both domains. According to UDRP rules, if more than one domain being disputed is held by the same respondent, all of the names may be included in the same complaint. Rule 3(b)(vi).

Talking about this story: Neowin, Kotaku, Joystiq, CNET, TechFlash, Shacknews, GamePolitics, 3DNews, SlashGear,, Herald Sun, GameSpot, IGN, VG247, Gameplanet, PC Magazine, Eurogamer, Game Informer, Gizmodo En Espanol, Kotaku Australia,, iTech Post, Den of Geek, SpieleRadar, Softpedia, WinFuture, Tech2, GameZone, GameDynamo, ITProPortal, Gamenguide, GamerZona, KultureGeek,,, GMA NewsGameFocus and PC Games

(Image of Xbox One via


Nice, another MS fiasco, yet again walking all over the little guy, the owner had the domain for TEN years before Microsoft comes along and steals it. If he wasn't properly remunerated I would sue their ass for everything they've got. If they don't like it they can as a previous poster suggested move to North Korea, we live in a MARKET economy.


Why they didn't register the name in the first place? think domains as real estate. If you don't buy it, its not yours, and you need to buy it if you want it. No crying, no excuses. The domain registrant saw the opportunity and took it. Capitalism. Don't like it? move to North Korea, China, Venezuela, Cuba or Argentina ASAP.


By any way I cannot imagine how Microsoft wants to prove that such domain names were reqistered in bad faith in regards to Microsoft marks. Unless they can prove that registrant can see a future...